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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 137-142

Lack of association between religiosity/spirituality and mental well being among medical students and interns


1 MBBS Student, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Parthasarathy Ramamurthy
Department of Psychiatry, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences (A Unit of Madras Medical Mission), Kalathumettupathai, Ganapathichettikulam, Village No. 20, Kalapet, Puducherry - 605 014
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aip.aip_17_19

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Background: High subjective well-being causes better health and longevity. Religiosity has been shown to be positively associated with subjective well-being of medical students. The composition and content of religion is different in India, and hence the role of religiosity and spirituality on mental well-being of Indian medical students requires exploration. The present study was conducted to assess the relationship of religiosity and spirituality with mental well-being among medical students and interns. Methods: Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS), Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS), and Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) were administered to medical students at a private medical college in South India. The association of religiosity and spirituality with mental well-being was analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results: There was no correlation between WEMWBS and CRS scores. Similarly, there was no correlation of WEMWBS score with ISS score. Among Christian and Muslim medical students, there was a significant correlation between WEMWBS and ISS scores. No such correlation was found among Hindu medical students. Conclusion: Overall, there was no association of mental well-being with religiosity and spirituality among medical students. However, there were significant differences in this association among students with different religious affiliations. Among Christian and Muslim medical students, there was a positive association of mental well-being with spirituality but not with religiosity. No such association was found among Hindu medical students.


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